There are several pathways to being admitted to the Athletic Training program.

Overview

Overview

Students admitted to Ohio State's School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences for undergraduate programs begin as pre-major students while they complete prerequisite coursework over 1-2 years. They apply for selective secondary admission to their program(s) of choice, and, if admitted, complete the program over the final 2-3 years. 

For the Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training (BSAT) program, the pre-major requirements are typically completed in a single year and students submit their applications for secondary program admission during the spring semester. The BSAT program seeks to admit resilient, reflective thinkers, demonstrating compassion and diversity in background and thought, who are driven to support the health and well-being of the people of Ohio and the global community. Up to 30 students are admitted to the program annually. The BSAT program has two secondary admission pathways: a traditional pathway and an early admission pathway. Students selected for secondary admission must complete several enrollment requirements over the summer such as CPR certification, immunizations, technical standards, and passing a criminal background check in order to enroll in professional courses and fieldwork. 


Traditional Admission Pathway

Most students are admitted to the BSAT program through this pathway. Pre-major AT students complete pre-requisite coursework and submit their secondary admission application during the spring semester (Jan. 31 deadline). Applicants are screened based on college academic performance and clinical observation performance (completed as part of ATHTRNG 2010) and a set of finalists are invited for admission interviews. Admission decisions are based on a holistic process that takes into account academic, clinical, and interview performance and are typically announced in March.

Early Admission Pathway

Up to 20% of the slots in each BSAT admission cohort are available for early admission to outstanding students directly out of high school. Students selected for early admission bypass the traditional secondary admission selection process and are assured of a place in the admission cohort provided they maintain a 3.0 GPA and satisfactorily complete prerequisite coursework and the clinical observation. Eligibility for the early admission pathway is open to high school seniors who have applied for admission to Ohio State’s Columbus campus, who rank in the top 20% of their graduating class (or have ACT composite score of 28 or greater) and who have been involved in Athletic Training while in high school (e.g. served as an "AT aide", attended an AT camp or workshop, etc.). Finalists will be invited to campus for a special event with facility tours, meetings with faculty and students, and interviews for early admission. 

To apply for the Early Admission Pathway, submit the following to the Athletic Training Division by November 1st:

  • (2) letters of recommendation, at least one of which is from a Certified Athletic Trainer.
  • Personal Statement (500 word limit) - "Which of your qualities do you think will make you an excellent Athletic Trainer?"
  • Verification of class rank from your high school (guidance office) or copy of ACT scores.
Submit materials to the following address or via email to at@osumc.edu

Athletic Training Early Admissions
The Ohio State University
Atwell Hall 228
453 W. 10th Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210

Prerequisites

Prerequisite Courses

BSAT program admission eligibility is based upon having completed all of the following by the end of the Spring Semester in which you apply for secondary admission.
  • ATHTRNG 2000 (3 hrs) - Basic Athletic Training
  • ATHTRNG 2010 (1 hrs) - Athletic Training Preclinical Skills (includes required Athletic Training observation)
  • ANATOMY 2300.04 (4 hrs) - Basic Human Anatomy
    • NOTE: This course must be human anatomy with a lab that uses human specimens. Animal/small mammal dissection courses (e.g. EEOB 2510) will not be accepted.
    • NOTE: We will not accept transfer credit for only a single “Anatomy & Physiology” combined course. If you are transferring credit for a combined "Anatomy & Physiology" course, it must have been a (2) course series (i.e. A&P 1 and A&P 2) with a minimum of 7 credits and includes a lab. We typically accept these as credit for both Human Anatomy (ANATOMY 2300.04) AND Human Physiology (EEOB 2520)
  • BIO 1113 (4 hrs) - Biological Sciences: Energy Transfer and Development
  • CHEM 1210 (5 hrs) - General Chemistry 1
  • MATH 1148 or higher (4 hrs) - Algebra & Trigonometry & Their Applications (Alternate course is MATH 1130)
  • HRS 2500 (3 hrs) - Medical Terminology (Alternate course is CLASSICS 2010)

Other Requirements

Other Requirements

  • Intent to practice: A strongly demonstrated intent to practice Athletic Training or sports medicine is required. Given our large number of applicants each year, applicants who do not intend to practice Athletic Training or sports medicine are less likely to be selected over applicants who demonstrate that they intend to practice the profession.
  • Academic performance: Minimum CPHR (cumulative GPA) of 2.5 (4.0 scale) is required for application. Admission is competitive and most successful applicants have a GPA's of 3.0 or higher. Students with a GPA below 3.0 are not likely to be admitted.
  • Clinical observation: Athletic Training observation supervised by a licensed athletic trainer is required (normally completed as part of ATHTRNG 2010). During this observation, students are evaluated on their suitability for the program and profession using an evaluation form that is distributed to students and reviewed at the beginning of the course. This evaluation is used as an important part of the admissions selection process.
  • Technical standards: Athletic Training students must be able to perform certain mental, physical, and other tasks that are essential in providing care for their patients. These requirements are outlined in the Technical Standards for Athletic Training section. After being offered admission, students must submit a certification that they are able to meet these standards (with or without accommodation) in order to enroll in the professional program.

Technical Standards

Technical Standards for Athletic Training

Athletic Training students must be able to perform certain mental, physical, and other tasks that are essential in providing care for their patients. These requirements are outlined in the Division’s Technical Standards for Athletic Training Students (listed at the bottom of this page or download from these links). These standards were developed in conjunction with the Ohio State University ADA compliance office and were adapted from a sample technical standards documents originally developed by our accrediting body (CAATE).  
After being admitted to the program, Athletic Training students must submit a signed certification statement stating that they believe that they can meet these standards with or without accommodation. The student’s statement is also confirmed through a physical examination by a licensed healthcare provider of the student’s choosing (physician, physician's assistant or advanced nurse practitioner) who also signs a statement on the form. The certification form and physical exam form must be on file before beginning the clinical experiences of the program. If a student believes they may require accommodation(s) in order to meet these requirements, they must have their need for accommodation validated through the Office for Disability Services (150 Pomerene Hall, 614-292-3307). ODS works jointly with the student and the Division of Athletic Training to explore accommodation options. Accommodation may not be possible in some cases.
  1. Any student who cannot meet each of the technical standards with or without accommodation can not be enrolled in the Athletic Training Education Program.
  2. Students requesting accommodations must have their need for accommodation validated through the Office of Disability Services.
  3. Requests for accommodation are not used prejudicially against students.
  4. Students are responsible for informing their instructors about needs for accommodation for courses or clinicals.
  5. Accommodation requests must be made in a timely fashion in order to permit adequate time to arrange the accommodation. It may not be possible to provide some accommodations on short notice.

Example of Essential Functional Tasks

The following is an EXAMPLE of an Essential Functional Task that Athletic Training Students must be able to perform and that is essential in providing care for their patients. This example can help with understanding our list of Technical Standards, but is not a replacement for them. This is a single example, not a comprehensive list of essential functions an Athletic Training student might need to perform.

Example: Field Set-up and Tear-down
Athletic Training students must have the ability to prepare athletic fields / courts for safe practice and/or competition activities. Some of the functions involved in preparing these venues include:

• The ability to determine the appropriate medical and other equipment that needs to be physically present on the field or court. This involves:

    • understanding the activities involved in the sportunderstanding the environmental risks for the sport venue (heat, cold, humidity, etc.)
    • understanding any special risks common for the population of athletes that participate in that sport (e.g. sickle cell trait, large body mass, increased ACL injury risk, diabetes, asthma, insect sting allergy, etc.)
    • analyzing the activities and risks to determine the emergency medical equipment needs (e.g. supplemental Oxygen, spine board, facemask removal tools, AED, asthma inhaler, Epi pen, cooling tubs, etc.)
    • analyzing the activities and risk to determine the non-emergency equipment needs (water, environmental measurement tools, tape, bandages, pads, braces, ice, etc.).
• The ability to convey the needed equipment to the field in a timely fashion. This involves:
    • retrieving the equipment from its storage locations
    • inspecting and analyzing the equipment to determine if it is clean and in good working order
    • filling water coolers and ice coolers
    • lifting and carrying the equipment to the field and/or loading the equipment onto carts that can be pushed or driven to the field including:
• a full 6-gallon water cooler weighs more than 50 pounds and is large and awkward to lift or carry. A full 10-gallon water cooler weighs more then 85 pounds.
• a spine board is not very heavy, but its size makes it awkward to carry
• some locations where equipment must be placed may not be accessible to motorized carts and equipment must be manually carried to these locations.
    • determining the most useful locations on the field for placement of the equipment (e.g. multiple water stations, AED in a central location, etc.).
    • unloading the proper equipment in the proper locations
    • having the field completely set-up and ready for play prior the beginning of practice periodically (and on short notice) moving or replacing equipment throughout the course of practice or competition to meet changing needs (change practice fields, refill water, etc.).
• The ability to "tear-down" the field by removing the equipment after the practice or competition has ended. This includes:
    • removing the equipment from the field by carrying and/or using carts to transport it
    • emptying, cleaning and inspecting the equipment to identify any damage or wear and tear that occurred during the practice or game.
    • maintaining, repairing or replacing damaged or worn equipment (e.g. recharging radios and golf-carts, replacing water cooler spigots, re-stocking expendable supplies, etc.)
    • returning the equipment to secure storage for the next use

Transfer Information

Transfer Information

Transferring a Course

The BSAT program does not accept transfer credit for ATHTRNG courses numbered 2100 or higher. We accept transfer credit for prerequisite and supporting coursework provided that they meet university requirements.  Students are advised to use the Transferology website to determine course equivalents or to contact the Athletic Training Division with specific questions.

Changing Universities

All students transferring to Ohio State for the BSAT program must go through the program’s secondary admission process, regardless of whether they were already enrolled in another professional AT education program at their previous university.  In some cases, transfer students will have completed all prerequisites and can immediately apply for secondary admission to the BSAT program.  However, in most cases, transfer students will not have met all of the program’s prerequisites and usually require an additional year after transferring before applying for secondary admission to the BSAT program.  Prospective transfer students should speak with a counselor from Ohio State’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Student Affairs office for guidance.

Changing Majors to Athletic Training

Current Ohio State University students who wish to change their major to Athletic Training should register for a Major Information Session offered through the Student Affairs Office of the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. 

Only after you have completed one of these sessions will you be able to meet with a pre-major advisor to change your major. Current OSU students must have a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average and 12 graded hours to switch to Athletic Training or any other program in the School of HRS.

Visits and AT Camp

Campus Visits

The best way to learn about a university is to visit it yourself. At Ohio State, you can arrange different types of visits depending on your needs. Those seeking a "general" visit should schedule a university admissions overview and tour.

The Athletic Training program also offers an additional, program specific visit each month where you can meet with the Director of the program, current students, and tour some of our facilities. You can come for either or both visit types and you register for both through the university visit center. We recommend registering at least 3-4 weeks prior to your intended visit because we have limited spaces available and they tend to fill-up quickly.

All AT Overview sessions meet in the atrium lobby of the Woody Hayes Athletic Center (535 Irving Schottenstein Dr., Columbus OH 43210) and typically last 60-90 minutes.

Register for a campus visit


Athletic Training Camp

Ohio State University hosts an annual overnight Athletic Training Camp for High School students each June. Learn more by visiting the athletic training camp site.

Visit the AT camp website

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